Monthly Archives: June 2017

The Process: How Used Restaurant Equipment Becomes Burkett Certified Product

Forty years ago, it was used restaurant equipment that allowed us to get into this business and open our doors.

Today, you’ll find used restaurant equipment being sold anywhere and everywhere. Online, off market, in stores, in garages, the options are endless. Some are good, some are bad, some are in between. Most are basically a quick wipe down and sold as is.

Here at Burkett, it’s a little different. In 40 years of experience, we have evolved the process of how we treat and recondition used restaurant equipment.

We take used restaurant equipment very seriously and have an entire service team dedicated to that process. That team takes great pride in the rigorous work done to give new life to used restaurant equipment to make it Burkett Certified Product. We care about what we do because not only is it a reflection the individual technicians, it’s a refection of Burkett as a whole and its commitment to quality.

Burkett Certified Product is a unique 10-step reconditioning and testing process that restores previously used items by repairing or replacing any defective components, upgrading cosmetics, and giving you a quality, ready-to-go reconditioned item hassle free. Check out the video below and check out our full selection of Burkett Certified Product here. Our selection is always changing so be sure to check back often. Our commitment to quality, however, never changes.

Diners finding more unconventional items to pilfer at pubs, restaurants

The fact that things get stolen from restaurants by patrons should come as a surprise to absolutely no one. The alarming trend is the fact that just about anything is up for grabs in restaurants these days and not just the stuff that fits in an oversized coat or handbag either.

A recent report by Bloomberg found that everything from fancy plates to paintings to fruit trees — even a giant ceramic pig — was being taken without hesitation and somehow unnoticed. The cost of these items can get into the thousands. One Japanese restaurant in New York, which serves its fare on $500 plates, has had 65 of those plates stolen. Simple math tells us that that’s about $32,500 worth of tableware that is, poof, gone.

Have you had an experience with patrons who had sticky fingers? What does your establishment do to stay vigilant for these kinds of situations? Share your story in the comments below.

 Scroll to top